Kateqoriya arxivləri: Iran

Baku Pushes New Azerbaijan-Iran-Turkey-Georgia Grouping to Enhance Intra-Regional Cooperation

Azerbaijani Foreign Minister Elmar Mammadyarov, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and Georgian Foreign Minister Mikheil Janelidze (Photo Credit: APA Agency)
Azerbaijani Foreign Minister Elmar Mammadyarov, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and Georgian Foreign Minister Mikheil Janelidze (Photo Credit: APA Agency)
Publication: Eurasia Daily Monitor Volume: 15 Issue: 46

On March 15, Baku hosted the first official ministerial meeting of a new quadrilateral regional format, encompassing Azerbaijan, Turkey, Iran and Georgia (Trend, March 15). The new grouping was conceived to enhance cooperation among the four neighboring states, particularly in the security sphere. Until now, perhaps the most productive intra-regional cooperation format in the South Caucasus was the Azerbaijan-Turkey-Georgia triangle. Under the umbrella of this trilateral format, the participating countries have worked to deepen their defense ties as well as held annual military drills (see EDM, March 11, 2014June 7, 2017). Despite attempts by some observers to portray the tripartite grouping as an anti-Russian bloc in the South Caucasus, the three states have denied such accusations. Oxumağa davam et Baku Pushes New Azerbaijan-Iran-Turkey-Georgia Grouping to Enhance Intra-Regional Cooperation

Georgia and Iran: A new bridge between the Persian Gulf and Black Sea?

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif (L) shakes hands with Georgian President Giorgi Margvelashvili in Tbilisi on April 18, 2017.
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif  shakes hands with Georgian President Giorgi Margvelashvili in Tbilisi on April 18, 2017.

In the end of April 2017, Georgia and Iran held several joint events, and round table meetings aimed at deepening of bilateral strategic cooperation between two regional countries. Even though, there are certain obstacles for growing cooperation, Iranian and Georgian officials have conducted two vis-a-vis meetings in the end of April.

Firstly, Iranian delegation headed by the Minister of Foreign Affairs Mohammad Javad Zarif visited Tbilisi on April 18. Simultaneously, on the same day, Tbilisi host the Georgian – Iranian Business Forum, where about 100 companies from both countries were represented. “Iran is a country with one of the most serious economic potentials” in the region, said Minister of Economy Giorgi Gakharia, during the opening ceremony.

Seemingly, by hosting the business forum for a number of Iranian companies, Georgia seeks to encourage them to invest more in various spheres of the country such as tourism, telecommunication, city infrastructure, and so on. Oxumağa davam et Georgia and Iran: A new bridge between the Persian Gulf and Black Sea?

Is the Iran – Armenia railway project an illusion?

Photo Credit: ArmeniaNow.com
Photo Credit: ArmeniaNow.com

The construction of a railroad connecting Armenia with Iran was first promised by Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan in an address to the National Assembly (parliament) in October 2008. Financing the construction, however, was a problematic issue: while Iranian officials confirmed the commitment to build a link connecting Iran’s existing railroad network to the Armenian border, a considerably larger investment would be required to carry out the construction on the Armenian side. The estimated cost of building the Armenian section of the railroad is about $3.2 billion, which does not include the costs of land acquisition and customs duties on equipment. The project’s entire cost is on a level comparable to Armenia’s annual budget.  Clearly, the lack of financial resources, as well as, necessary political willpower, also can be seen as a reason behind the non-implementation of the project. Oxumağa davam et Is the Iran – Armenia railway project an illusion?

Will the ‘Troika format’ of Astana talks bring peace to Syria?

Turkish Foreign Ministry Deputy Undersecretary Sedat Onal, left, and Kazakh Foreign Minister Kairat Abdrakhmanov shake hands, as Russia’s special envoy on Syria Alexander Lavrentiev and Iran’s Deputy Foreign Minister Hossein Jaber Ansari, right, shake hands and UN Syria envoy Staffan de Mistura stand after the final statement following the talks on Syrian peace in Astana, Kazakhstan, Tuesday, Jan. 24, 2017. (Photo: AP)

On January 23, the next phase of peace talks started in the capital of Kazakhstan, Astana. Syria’s government and opposition forces are to meet in Kazakh capital Astana for the first time since the fall of Aleppo.

Negotiations between the Syrian government delegation and rebel fighters, sponsored by Russia and Turkey – who have been backing different sides of the conflict – are expected to last three days. One of the most significant points of the talks is that this time Syrian opposition is represented mainly by the militant groups, which fight in Syria, not just by secular, and political forces. Nevertheless, uncertainty prevails over all aspects of the talks – from the attendant list to the agenda of the meeting.

The guarantors of the Astana talks – Turkey, Iran, and Russia are seemingly making efforts to show the effectiveness of “Troika” Oxumağa davam et Will the ‘Troika format’ of Astana talks bring peace to Syria?

Will the Oil Producing Giants’ Rare Cooperation Last?

On November 30, OPEC secured a cut in oil production from 33.8 million barrels a day (b/d) to 32.5 million b/d. As cheap oil from the global oil glut created budgetary shortfalls in oil-producing countries across the world, the severe economic challenges facing petro-states led to this special agreement, which is OPEC’s first to cut oil output since 2008, and the first time that non-OPEC Russia will back the cartel’s cuts to prop up prices since 2001. This unexpected decision sparked a huge rally in the price of both oil and gasoline. Given the state of regional turmoil from Syria to Yemen, however, it is legitimate to ask if politics will cause the agreement to fall apart in 2017.

The agreement was designed to reduce the production in global oil markets. It was successful despite pessimistic forecasts leading up to last month’s meeting in Vienna.After all, OPEC’s April 2016 meeting, held in Doha, ended with no deal, as member countries did not reach any consensus on the level of oil production. Iran participated in private talks led by Qatar, which currently holds the Oxumağa davam et Will the Oil Producing Giants’ Rare Cooperation Last?

Bildiyimiz təhlükəsizlik anlayışı demək olar ki mövcud deyil

dasdasdasda-768x384

“Bizim bildiyimiz təhlükəsizlik anlayışı demək olar ki mövcud deyil”

Bu sözləri GSR.fm-ə ABŞ-da keçiriləcək Nüvə Sammitinin məqsədi barədə müsahibəsində siyasi araşdırmaçı Fuad Şahbazov deyib:

ABŞ İranı nüvə təhlükəsizliyi sammitinə dəvət etməyib. Bunun səbəbləri nələrdir?

İranın saammitə dəvət edilməməsinin fərqli səbəbləri var. Lakin İranın Vaşinqtondakı nüvə sammitinə dəvət edilməməsinin səbəblərini demək bir qədər çətindir. Vaşinqtonda keçiriləcək sammitin əsas hədəfi gündən günə daha da təhlükəli hal alan qlobal terrorizm məsələsini daha da qabartmaqdır. Oxumağa davam et Bildiyimiz təhlükəsizlik anlayışı demək olar ki mövcud deyil

How Iranian Oil Would Change the South Caucasus?

ma1

After more than a decade of negotiations, the economic sanctions against Iran were lifted in January. Iran, P5+1 countries and the European Union agreed on the adoption of a Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA). The JCPOA limited the Islamic Republic’s nuclear program as a quid-pro-quo for a return to oil market. Iran’s return to global oil markets would mean a new challenge both for Europe and the South Caucasus. This paper will examine the political and economic implications of the lifting of sanctions for the South Caucasus region. Oxumağa davam et How Iranian Oil Would Change the South Caucasus?