Kateqoriya arxivləri: Turkish foreign policy

How Will Erdogan’s Recent Visit to Uzbekistan Enhance Turkish-Uzbek Cooperation?

President of Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdogan (R) and President of Uzbekistan Shavkat Mirziyoyev (L) hold a joint press conference ( Kayhan Özer - Anadolu Agency )
President of Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdogan (R) and President of Uzbekistan Shavkat Mirziyoyev (L) hold a joint press conference ( Kayhan Özer – Anadolu Agency )

While Turkey’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) is focused on the upcoming snap elections on June 24, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan paid a historic visit to Uzbekistan in early May. Uzbekistan-Turkey relations reached its zenith in the 1990s shortly after the breakup of the Soviet Union. Uzbekistan became an obvious target for Turkish soft power. Since the beginning of the 2000s, however, the bilateral relationship between Ankara and Tashkent deteriorated, in part because of the isolationist policy of then-President of Uzbekistan Islam Karimov and also in part because of ideological differences and the fact that exiled opposition leader Muhammad Salih resided in Turkey.   Oxumağa davam et How Will Erdogan’s Recent Visit to Uzbekistan Enhance Turkish-Uzbek Cooperation?

Baku Pushes New Azerbaijan-Iran-Turkey-Georgia Grouping to Enhance Intra-Regional Cooperation

Azerbaijani Foreign Minister Elmar Mammadyarov, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and Georgian Foreign Minister Mikheil Janelidze (Photo Credit: APA Agency)
Azerbaijani Foreign Minister Elmar Mammadyarov, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu, Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif and Georgian Foreign Minister Mikheil Janelidze (Photo Credit: APA Agency)
Publication: Eurasia Daily Monitor Volume: 15 Issue: 46

On March 15, Baku hosted the first official ministerial meeting of a new quadrilateral regional format, encompassing Azerbaijan, Turkey, Iran and Georgia (Trend, March 15). The new grouping was conceived to enhance cooperation among the four neighboring states, particularly in the security sphere. Until now, perhaps the most productive intra-regional cooperation format in the South Caucasus was the Azerbaijan-Turkey-Georgia triangle. Under the umbrella of this trilateral format, the participating countries have worked to deepen their defense ties as well as held annual military drills (see EDM, March 11, 2014June 7, 2017). Despite attempts by some observers to portray the tripartite grouping as an anti-Russian bloc in the South Caucasus, the three states have denied such accusations. Oxumağa davam et Baku Pushes New Azerbaijan-Iran-Turkey-Georgia Grouping to Enhance Intra-Regional Cooperation

Azerbaijan-Turkey-Georgia: A Geopolitical Axis or an Accidental Alliance?

Azerbaijani, Turkish, Georgian high-ranking military officials observe Azerbaijani-Turkish joint exercises; June 2017. Photo Credit: Azvision.az
Azerbaijani, Turkish, Georgian high-ranking military officials observe Azerbaijani-Turkish joint exercises; June 2017. Photo Credit: Azvision.az
Publication: Eurasia Daily Monitor Volume: 14 Issue: 75

The Georgian coastal city of Batumi hosted, on May 23, a trilateral meeting of the defense ministers of Azerbaijan, Turkey and Georgia (Azertac, May 23). This trilateral cooperation format was inaugurated in 2012, during a ministerial meeting in Trabzon, Turkey. As expected, a new military memorandum was signed during the Batumi meeting: the three sides pledged to boost military ties as well as increase cooperation in the fields of military education and military medicine, counterterrorism (including the protection of pipelines and railways), and joint large-scale military exercises (APA, May 23). “Our cooperation in the field of defense contributes to strengthening security, peace and economic development,” Azerbaijani Defense Minister Zakir Hasanov told reporters in Batumi (Azertac, May 23). Oxumağa davam et Azerbaijan-Turkey-Georgia: A Geopolitical Axis or an Accidental Alliance?

Will the Liberation of Mosul Inflame Ethnic Tensions?

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On October 17th the Iraqi government officially launched a mass offensive to liberate the ISIS-held northern city of Mosul. The Iraqi army in collaboration with a coalition which includes the Kurdish Peshmerga and US military, is approaching the city step by step. Since ground operations were launched at dawn on Monday by the Iraqi army, Kurdish Peshmerga fighters, under the control of the Kurdish Regional Government (KRG), and various ethnic-based irregular militias, the advancing troops have captured 20 villages from the Islamic State. Peshmerga forces have captured part of the road connecting Irbil, the KRG capital, to Mosul. Oxumağa davam et Will the Liberation of Mosul Inflame Ethnic Tensions?

Başika uğrunda alovlanan Türkiyə – İraq qarşıdurması

Photo: Reuters
Photo: Reuters

Türkiyə Silahlı Qüvvələrinin bu ilin avqust ayında başlatdığı “Fərat Qalxanı” əməliyyatının bir parçası olaraq İraqa da qoşun yeritməsi təkcə rəsmi Bağdadı yox, Ağ Evdə də ciddi narahatlıqlar yaratdı.

Türk ordusunun şimali İraqa zirehli texnika yeritməsi İraq parlamentində birmənalı qarşılanmadı.

Buna cavab olaraq ölkə parlamenti İraqdakı türk əsgərinin varlığını “beynəlxalq hüquqa zidd” bir addım kimi qiymətləndirdi. Türkiyə tərəfi isə öz növbəsində İraqlı həmkarlarını sərt şəkildə tənqid edərək bunu regional təhlükəsizlik baxımından zəruri bir addım olduğu haqda bəyanat yaydı. Oxumağa davam et Başika uğrunda alovlanan Türkiyə – İraq qarşıdurması

Why did Turkey enter Syria?

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The Syrian civil war has been raging for over five years, and there are still no winners on sight. On the contrary – new actors are becoming involving into the conflict day by day – this week the Turkish army also joined the fray, by intervening in the Syrian city of Jarablus to support Free Syrian Army militants and fight against Islamic State (ISIS). Jarablus is a vital supply line for Islamic state and one of its last remaining strongholds on the border. Every actor in the Jarablus operation is fighting for its own reasons. Turkey certainly sought to weaken the Islamic State, which has shelled Turkish territory and carried out a Oxumağa davam et Why did Turkey enter Syria?

Did Putin And Erdogan Have A Deal On The Syrian Crisis?

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On August 9, presidents Vladimir Putin and Recep Tayyip Erdogan for the first time held an official meeting in St. Petersburg after the failed coup attempt in Turkey and deteriorated relations over the downed Su-24 warplane. Reportedly, both leaders agreed to put on the table the number of cancelled projects, such as the “Turkish stream” pipeline. The pipeline is aimed to deliver Russian natural gas through Turkey to the Southern part of Europe. Obviously, the project means a lot for Russian Gazprom, as it allows strengthening of the Russian gas monopoly in Europe. Even though Russia plans to start the construction next year, it still needs strong guarantees from Brussels.

A part of the proposed pipeline project, Moscow officials seek an opportunity to renew the contract regarding the nuclear power plant “Akkuyu” in Turkey. But despite the recent Russian-Turkish rapprochement, it is nearly impossible to shift the bilateral relations so fast after such a deep crisis. Oxumağa davam et Did Putin And Erdogan Have A Deal On The Syrian Crisis?